Friday, August 04, 2006

Don't forget about Sales Tax Holidays



My state is having a "Tax Free Weekend" this weekend that starts today. There are 12 other states that do the "Tax Free" thing.

Also don't forget to check out your state's Department Of Revenue website for exemptions and for a form to claim "virtually any item" tax free.

In states such as Georgia ... this is a 7% break!

Personally, I am having a huge sale on top of the 5% sales tax break!

I think this is a complete list of states that offer "Sales Tax Breaks" - usually during the first weekend in August:

West Virginia
Virginia
New York
Massachussetts
Connecticut
Texas
South Carolina
Vermont
Missouri
North Carolina
Iowa
Georgia
Florida

Apple sent me this email this morning indicating that all purchases originating from my state during this weekend are tax free as well:

South Carolina Sales Tax Holiday
August 4 - August 6, 2006

To qualify for the tax exemption, the purchase MUST meet these criteria:

Items must be purchased by an individual for personal use.

Qualified exempt items:

Computer, printers, printer supplies, and software. Keyboards, scanners, monitors are only exempt if purchased as part of a package with a CPU.

Computer hardware service contracts sold in conjunction with computers

Computer Software

Computer Software service contracts sold in conjuction with the computer software

Individual education sales are tax-exempt. Institution education sales are not tax exempt.

iTunes Music Store prepaid cards and Apple Store gift cards are exempt.

In addition to the limitations listed above, the following products are NOT eligible for the exemption:

- Items purchased for a business or trade
- All video games
- Digital cameras
- Digital video cameras
- Joysticks
- Games Pads and related game devices
- MP3 Players (including the iPod)
- Speakers

The transaction does NOT qualify for the exemption if:

The item is purchased for use in a trade or business. This exemption only applies to sales to individuals who will be using the item for personal use.

The item is purchased with the education (institution) discount.

Please also note the following:

While the sales tax holiday is in progress, all other exemptions remain in effect using the standard exemption process.

There will be no rainchecks. Items must be purchased during the tax holiday weekend.
If the customer wishes to order online, the customer must have a South Carolina shipping address in order to take advantage of the tax holiday.

Rebates and promotions -- All terms and conditions remain the same for all offers. If the items qualify for the tax exemption, then the rebate is still valid.




Use this form for most any state to take to a retailer for a sales tax exemption. You may need to consult with your State's Department Of Revenue and note that this may not be the proper form you need ... it is valid in SC, NC, & GA for this weekend.

In the past I have used this form to purchase a Plasma TV - because I was going to use it for presentation purchases for classes.

And don't forget, if you have a friend or family member in a state that's hosting a tax free weekend, you could get them to order something for you from the Apple Store and pick up or have it delivered.

An example of the savings:

In South Carolina: $1000 = $50 Sales Tax Savings at 5% SC Sales tax

Also don't forget that Apple is currently running a promotion for free printers!

(If you see a state that is not included, leave it in the comments and I will update ASAP)

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

Yes. This is an awesome deal. Today at the Kansas City Apple Store, the line (and wait) was tremendous. It was unbelievable. Took us over 2 hours to finally purchase our MacBook and they were taking orders out on the sidewalk and answering questions to try and speed things up.

Macs of all kinds were flying out of the door. Lots of first time Mac buyers in line.

Anonymous said...

I'm not sure New York is included. I can't find any confirmation online about this.

fixyourthinking said...

Sorry I didn't get back to you New Yorker:

http://www.salestaxinstitute.com/archiveTaxHolidays.jsp