Monday, December 12, 2005

The Responsibility Of The Media To Mention Macs

As I watched a segment on last night's NBC Nightly News I noticed something interesting ...



Actually it was what I didn't see that inspired this post ...

The segment involved Spyware ...

The focus was about tracking your children's internet surfing and possibly exposing your entire computer to password and identity theft ...

BUT ... the segment mentioned terms "your computer" and not terms like "Computers with the Windows operating system"

This is almost as if they had reported a story in this manner ...

US residents support the war in Iraq

Well, depending on what polls you read, or what data you include; the majority of US residents do support the war in Iraq (or support our troops there), but a certain percentage (around 10%) don't support it in any way whatsoever.

However, news outlets usually make a certain effort to report the 10% of Iraqi war protestors ...

They report in such a way that many believe that 10%, to be the majority of Americans.

If news outlets were to reveal the whole truth about spyware, adware, and viruses ... that Macs, as yet, have been unaffected by these obtrusive nightmares that Windows users face ... do you also think that the people that see these segements on television and read these articles in newspapers ... might consider a Mac?

Or let's place this into a conspiracy ... are the news outlets being fed these stories by the internet security firms such as Symantec and MacAfee?



The segment was introduced as [anonymous] "Experts say ..." and generic terms such as "Home PC" and "Computers were used"

Apple Computers are computers and home PCs ... aren't they?

4 comments:

Michael Gracie said...

You are absolutely right, but I wonder if Apple sees it the same way. I have commented plenty on the security of Macs over at Spamroll while happily typing away on my Powerbook. Unfortunately, I see little being done on Apple's end to tout the end-to-end solidness of the Unix platform they glamorized. Is Steve waiting for something much worse to happen in the Windows world before he lets his crew speak up?

Xavier Itzmann said...

I subscribe to the WSJ.

For years, I wrote them anytime they reported a virus or worm attack and did not clearly identify that only Microsoft Windows computers were victims.

They've since learned, altough they relapse from time to time.

Russet Shadows said...

You've nailed it. The media is comprised of people who show us repeatedly just how worthless a degree in journalism really is. *shaking head* The news conveys only one thing with any degree of regularity -- fear.

Middle-agedman said...

I recently was listening to a local radio station show where the host was asking people to call in and give their opinion on Microsoft's development of virus and spyware prevention software. I could not believe how casual most people were viewing this. While it is certainly commendable to produce a good product, when its design is to repair or patch deficiencies in your main product it begs the question: why not make it right to start with?
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Microsoft has long been accused of releasing software that should have stayed in beta and then releasing bug fixes after consumers start having problems. This seems to take that tendency to the next level.

I agree with this article that the current bulletproof status of Macs concerning viruses and spyware has been all but ignored in the popular press. The issue that befuddles me, however, is that people accept this state of affairs as "normal" and rush out to purchase all manner of other products to "fix" the problem. Every year. Has Bill brainwashed PC users to the extent that they will now pay for the privelege of using his buggy software?