Thursday, August 25, 2005

Apple Naming Policy

Apple's naming policy:

Guidelines for Using Apple Trademarks and Copyrights

I refer to the page above often on this site.

Here is an excerpt from this page withFixYourThinking emphasis in bold:

Apple's trademarks, service marks, trade names, and trade dress are valuable assets. In following these guidelines, you help us protect our valuable trademark rights and strengthen our corporate and brand identities. By using an Apple trademark, in whole or in part, you are acknowledging that Apple is the sole owner of the trademark and promising that you will not interfere with Apple's rights in the trademark, including challenging Apple's use, registration of, or application to register such trademark, alone or in combination with other words, anywhere in the world, and that you will not harm, misuse, or bring into disrepute any Apple trademark.


I say that entities such as Bill Palmer and Jack Campbell harm, misuse, and bring Apple trademarks into disrepute.

This particular example from the Naming Policy Page is most interesting concerning the MacMice brand name and the iPodGarage website:

Variations, Takeoffs or Abbreviations: You may not use an image of a real apple or other variation of the Apple logo for any purpose. Third parties cannot use a variation, phonetic equivalent, foreign language equivalent, takeoff, or abbreviation of an Apple trademark for any purpose. For example:

Not acceptable: Appletree Jackintosh Apple Cart


Ever wonder what the reasons were for ipodlounge.com becoming ilounge.com? This was one - under pressure from Apple.

How could the company name MacMice or the website name iPodGarage not be in violation of these terms as well?

As a side note, while looking up information about Apple's naming policy, I found two instances where Apple has gotten in trouble for "violating" another's name.

Singer Bob Dylan purportedly sued Apple Computer for naming a computer language; "Dylan." (An abbreviation for "Dynamic Language.")

Deceased astronomer; Carl Sagan also complained to Apple when they starting using "Sagan" as the internal code name for the PowerMac 7100. Apple stopped using his name, but instead started calling it the "BHA." Sagan sued Apple anyway for trademark infringement, defamation, and invasion of privacy; claiming that it was well known that Apple used "BHA" as an acronym for "butt-head astronomer." The case was thrown out of court.

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

1. Company, Product, or Service Name: You may not use or register, in whole or in part, Apple, iPod, iTunes, Macintosh, iMac, or any other Aphereof, as or as part of a company name, trade name, product name, or se1. Company, Product, or Service Name: You may not use or register, in whole or in part, Apple, iPod, iTunes, Macintosh, iMac, or any other Apple trademark, including Apple-owned graphic symbols, logos, icons, or an alteration thereof, as or as part of a company name, trade name, product name, or service name except as specifically noted in these guidelines.rvice name except as specifically noted in these guidelines.ple trademark, including Apple-owned graphic symbols, logos, icons, or an alteration t